6 Fun Do-At-Home Activities

Losing patience with those you’ve been locked up with during these weeks of social distancing? Looking for some new ideas to keep everyone busy while we wait for permission to get out and get social again? Here are some fun things people have been doing – you might find a few new ideas among them!

Sensory walk

Create a fun path to follow along the sidewalk out front. Incorporate hopscotch, spinning, hopping, walking sideways. Stephanie Westbrook created one that incorporates lots of gross motor activity.  You can also add other sensory stimuli – warm water in a dishpan, river rocks, sand, mud.

Getty Masterpiece Challenge

The J Paul Getty Museum is inviting everyone to explore the museum virtually from home. They recently issued a challenge through social media, inviting you to recreate a famous work of art with objects from around your home. We had so much fun!

A picture of Michaelangelo's painting Study of a Mourning Woman is shown beside a picture of a child wrapped in a white sheet, recreating the painting.

For more inspiration check out what others have done with this challenge in their newsletter.

Long-distance gaming

Set up a Zoom or Facetime session with loved ones and play some games together. Any board game that doesn’t require randomly shuffled cards is fair game. Try Yahtzee, Bingo, or Monopoly. Other collaborative activities that can be done over video conferencing include talent shows, trivia contests, and charades. One creative family invited family members to create a 6 slide PowerPoint presentation on any topic and then share them at a family zoom meeting.

Artist for Hire

Have a child that loves to draw? Invite friends and family to commission a drawing. My grandson invited people to request drawings of specific bird species. He draws the requested bird and then mails them to the recipient. He loves sharing his talent and recipients have loved the special ‘snail mail.’

Backyard “Camping”

 If you’ve got a tent stored away in anticipation of summer camping trips, pull it out and set it up in the backyard. Let the kids play in it, do school in it, or just take a break in it. Turn it into a destination – somewhere different to go. It just might help with the monotony of being always at home.

Puppets and Plays

For artistically inclined children, gather a variety of household items (fabric, paper, yarn, the recycling), some glue, tape, and a stapler and invite them to create puppets and invent a puppet play. If you have a large cardboard box, creating the puppet stage can be part of the activity. If not, drape a sheet over the dining table instead.

What have you done for creative fun during this time at home? Share your experience in the comments below.

 

Lynne Brown is a freelance writer, former Montessori teacher, and mom to seven amazing kids, some of whom now have kids of their own. She loves writing on parenting and early childhood education. You can learn more about her at: www.lynnebrownwriting.com.

Celebrating Valentine’s Day, Family Style

Valentines heart shapes in red and pink glued like balloons on a red background

It’s February and Valentine’s Day is right around the corner.  While many of us think of Valentine’s Day as a time to celebrate our romantic relationships, it doesn’t have to be just for grownups.  Celebrate Valentine’s Day family-style and share the spirit of love and affection with your kids this Valentine’s Day with these ideas for including the whole family in Valentine’s Day festivities.

Set the Mood

Decorate! Invite the kids to help you create paper hearts and chains to hang on walls and in windows. Make Valentine-themed placemats.  If you’re feeling adventurous, feature a Valentine tree where your Christmas tree sat! 

Your family can even put small gifts from the heart underneath to help create a sense of wonder and anticipation. Gifts can include small treats and useful items, or consider including handmade gift certificates. “Read aloud time”, “Walk the dog”, or “Help in the kitchen” are all great ways to model selfless giving.

Love of Food

Nothing says Valentine’s Day like special foods! Have a heart-filled menu for the day. 

The tools to make valentine cookies are gathered together, flour in a red ramkin, eggs in an egg carton, two heart shaped cookie cutters and a rolling pin.

Break out the heart-shaped cookie cutters and heart-shaped muffin pans and have some fun! Serve waffles, pancakes, toast, and sweet muffins in heart shapes along with a side of sliced strawberries and a dollop of whipped cream.

For a gluten-free start to the day, use heart-shaped cookie or biscuit cutters in a shallow frying pan to create heart-shaped eggs.  Or blend up a red breakfast smoothie made with beets.

If you’re packing lunches, Your cookie cutters come in handy to create heart-shaped sandwiches or pieces of cheese.  Serve them alongside red fruits or bowls of their favorite soup. Include a special Valentine card to make them smile.

Pull out all the stops for a romantic Valentine’s Day family dinner. Light candles or turn off overhead lights and use lamps. Put out fresh flowers and play soft music.  During dinner invite each family member to tell something they love about the others. Ask questions and really listen to the feelings beneath the answers. Finish the sharing with a funny story to lighten the mood.

Make the grand finale special by including chocolate or another favorite flavor in the form of brownies, cookies, or even ice cream. The kids can help create the menu and help you bake or assemble the goodies.)

Love of Play

Nothing says family like spending fun time together. Gather up the electronics, turn off the screens, and enjoy some good old-fashioned family fun this Valentine’s Day.

Break out the craft supplies and create Valentine cards. The Victorian era was the high point of exchanging Valentine’s cards. Print out some frilly Victorian images to cut and paste onto construction paper. Add ribbons and lace plus a warm sentiment or verse of poetry. (You can even exchange the cards at dinner.)

Take the family out for the evening.  Head to a movie, a family adventure center, or even the animal shelter to love on the puppies and kittens. Enjoy your time together by choosing something you all love to do together.   

adult and child hands holding red heart on aqua background,

Love of Family

Spend some time looking through photo albums and invite questions about the pictures you see together.  Use the opportunity to tell stories of loved ones and past adventures to help your kids feel like a part of your extended family.  The tale of the time Great-Uncle Paul got to ride an elephant will spark lively conversations and ignite wonder in your kids’ imaginations.

Another way to show love of family is to exchange chores for the day. Each family member takes over one chore from another, and dad or mom can help younger kids complete a grown-up chore for the other parent. Kids feel a special sense of pride when they’ve done something for someone else. Use dinner time to announce the chore and gratitude for the other person’s efforts.

Love of Life

End your family Valentine’s Day with a book about love from the library and a cuddle on the couch.  Reading together, sharing thoughts, and being grateful for the day of love and family can make a perfect ending to your family Valentine’s Day celebrations.  

Let this Valentine’s Day be a time of love, giving, and reflection. Fun foods, celebrating together, and sharing thoughts can build a sense of connection and unity.   A little planning can make this the very best Season of Love ever.

What are your family celebration plans for this Valentine’s Day?

 

Lynne Brown is a freelance writer, former Montessori teacher, and mom to seven amazing kids, some of whom now have kids of their own.  You can learn more about her at www.lynnebrownwriting.com.

Family Traditions Build Strong Families

Traditions are an important part of family culture.  The things we do together routinely, over and over, become our family’s traditions and define our family’s unique family culture.  Family traditions can be big (the Thanksgiving meal or family reunions) and traditions can be small (saying grace before dinner or sharing a hug when parting).  

Big or small, family traditions help define a family’s culture and help strengthen families in a number of important ways.  

What is a tradition?

What do we mean when we say ‘tradition’? Webster’s dictionary defines ‘tradition’ as “an inherited, established, or customary pattern of thought, action, or behavior (such as a religious practice or a social custom).”  

Simply put, a tradition is something that is done the same way over time.  The holidays we celebrate and the way we celebrate them are often traditions that have been handed down from generation to generation.

Following traditions that have been passed down from previous generations contributes to a family’s unique family culture.

What is ‘family culture’?

Culture is the way a group of people collectively thinks, feels and acts. We often think of countries, or regions of a country, as having a culture that is unique and different from the country or region next door.  

But families also have a culture, whether they intentionally set out to create one or not.  The things you do as a family, the values you hold and demonstrate to your children by your actions, and the daily, weekly, or annual rituals of family members all form a family culture that is unique to your family.

Why are traditions important?

Those habits we form together in a family can provide each family member with connection, comfort, and the security of being part of a like-minded group.  Shared activities strengthen the connections between family members and provide a source of identity and feeling of belonging.  

Traditions, and family culture, are also a way to pass along the values you hold dear to your children.  

When we form family traditions, we create opportunities to build connections within our family.  The things we do together regularly as a family- daily, weekly, or even annually – give children a sense of belonging.  

Daily traditions are small things you do each day to reinforce your family values and connection.  A high-five as kids leave for the school bus. Or the commitment to sit and eat a meal together around the dinner table.  

Weekly traditions can also be small activities you do together as a group to build strong, supportive relationships. Family game night on the weekend. Attending religious services together each week.

Life Change traditions celebrate family milestones – the beginning and end of a school year, birthdays, graduations, and weddings. 

For more on the importance of family traditions – and how to create them – check out Creating a Positive Family Culture.  

 

In our family, we have a simple birthday tradition that involves hanging streamers from the chandelier over the dining room table.  The streamers are hung after the birthday person has gone to bed the night before their birthday. The next morning the whole family is part of birthday excitement, seeing the table festooned with birthday streamers. The streamers stay up all day, and sometimes beyond the day if I forget to take them down!

Another family tradition at our house is the advent wreath in the center of the dining room table right after Thanksgiving each year.  Each Sunday in Advent, we read from a script that we brought home from church in 1984. It’s looking pretty tattered at this point, but it’s a family tradition we all cherish.  

One of our more recently implemented family traditions was started by my 17-year-old, who a few years back began baking massive amounts of cookies throughout the month of December.  By Christmas, we have platters of cookies, in an assortment of epic proportions. 

This goes to show that family traditions, while enduring and often passed down generation to generation, can also be begun, or even stopped, at any time.  

Family traditions can also be implemented at any time.  And can begin spontaneously. Our streamer tradition started that way.  The first time I hung them, it wasn’t in a conscious effort to start a tradition. But when the next birthday rolled around, someone asked where the streamers were.  And a tradition was born.

What family traditions define your family’s culture?  

Family traditions work together with a family’s values and norms to form a family’s culture.  They provide family members with a healthy sense of belonging, security, and connection – contributing to everyone’s well-being and healthy emotional development.

 

 

 

Family Fun: It’s Good for Everybody

Who doesn’t love to have fun? Summer is the perfect time to break out of the routine and have some family fun together. There are so many benefits — to both parents and children — when families have fun together. 

Families playing together build stronger bonds between parents and children, strengthen communication skills, and pave the way for better behavior in their growing children. The simple fact: families having fun together contributes to healthy child development.

Stronger bonds 

Prior to the 20th century, family bonding occurred primarily through shared work and household chores. With industrialization came a shift in family roles and family dynamics. Urban and suburban families today are not working together all day on the family farm, but finding time to have fun together can provide families opportunities to develop strong emotional connections and deeper family relationships. 

We play a lot of board games at our house. As the children get older, we’ve moved on to strategy games that can take hours to complete. Those hours spent together around the game table provide opportunities for conversation. Often the conversation has nothing to do with the game in front of us. Especially for teens, the game table provides a low-stress, device-free environment where they are more likely to share their thoughts and feelings, about particular issues or just life in general.

Better communication

Engaging in activities as a family group helps children learn to communicate with people who have different styles, opinions, and ways of doing things. Young children observe and then model the behavior of the adults around them. Playing together each individual contributes to the conversation in their own unique way. These varied styles of communication allow young children to observe differences and help them develop robust communication skills.

Better behavior

More family-time together creates stronger emotional bonds as well. Relationship skills help children develop well and have a long lasting effect. Research has shown that teens who spend more time with their parents are less likely to skip school or get into trouble with the law (see Wiley Online).

Better health — and less stress

Spending time together having fun helps both the adults in the family and their children reduce the impact of stress on their health and well-

being. Findings from a Canadian research study “underscore the importance of giving greater attention to the role of leisure as a means of coping with stress.”

 

Choosing energetic activities for family fun, like biking or soccer, will elevate heart rates and reduce cortisol levels. Cortisol is the body’s stress hormone, also known as it’s ‘alarm system.’ Turning off the alarm system with activities that get the body moving can help lower blood pressure. 

With so many good reasons. Let’s all take some time this summer to have some family fun together. It does not need to be elaborate or expensive. Here are some suggestions from 100 Ways to Have Fun with Your Kids for Free or Cheap:

  • Have a reading marathon.
  • Write stories together.
  • Play soccer.
  • Paint or draw together.
  • Create a fort in your living room out of blankets or cardboard boxes.
  • Go on a hike.
  • Have a sunset picnic at a park or beach.
  • Play board games.

You can read the full list here: 100 Ways to Have Fun with Your Kids for Free or Cheap

 

Lynne Brown is a freelance writer, former Montessori toddler teacher, and mom to seven amazing kids, some of whom now have kids of their own.  You can learn more about her at www.lynnebrownwriting.com.