The Benefits of Gratitude

November is National Gratitude Month and what better time to think about being thankful than the weeks leading up to our national holiday of Thanksgiving? Even in a year as crazy as 2020, the mental-health benefits of gratitude are there for the taking.

Being grateful takes little time and no money, but can enhance mental health, improve sleep, contribute to better physical health, and enrich social connections. Amy Morin, in a recent Forbes article, shares 7 scientifically proven benefits of gratitude: improved physical health, improved psychological health, better relationships, enhanced empathy, better sleep, improved self-esteem, and increased mental strength.

With so many good reasons to be grateful, here are some time-proven ways to increase your gratitude quotient, not just during the Thanksgiving holiday, but all year long.

                        “Gratitude is a powerful catalyst for happiness. It’s the spark that lights a fire of joy in your soul.” 

 -Amy Collette, author of the Gratitude Connection

Slow down

When we are in a hurry, our bodies respond by increasing the production of stress chemicals to help us keep up. These chemicals, which stimulate our ‘fight or flight’ response, increase anxiety. It’s hard to be grateful when we’re anxious. Slowing down, just enough to reduce the anxious response in our bodies, opens the door for gratitude. Reducing stress hormones also improves our physical and mental health. Win, win!

Be mindful

Like slowing down, being mindful helps us be more consciously aware of our environment, those people and things around us. When we pause and notice, we create space for gratitude. Our gratitude doesn’t have to dwell on just big and wonderful things. Noticing our small daily successes and being grateful for them brings the same benefits as celebrating big wins. Opportunities for gratitude can also encompass lessons learned in coping with difficulties. Have you learned new things, or gained new coping skills, through a hard situation? Celebrate that growth with gratitude.

Appreciate the little things

Like gratitude found in personal growth, there is gratitude to be found in the every day as well. Yesterday the rain let up just as I left the house to walk the dog. The next downpour held off until after I was back inside. Finding gratitude in that small win improved my mood for the rest of the afternoon. When we take time to notice the little things in our life that we have to be thankful for, it helps develop a practice of gratitude that contributes to our well being.

Look for happiness

Sometimes we have to work a little harder to find gratitude and happiness. Not feeling particularly happy about our social isolation? Me either. But over these last few months, I’ve spent some time with a hobby that had been packed away for lack of time. I am happy to have the knitting needles back in my hands. And for that I am grateful. Happiness in one area can spill over and help us feel gratitude in other areas of our life. Have you picked up a new hobby this year?

There has been a lot to be anxious about this year. Acknowledging our anxiety is important to our mental health. Acknowledging our emotional responses to all of the hard things we are experiencing builds resilience and improves mental health. On the other side of that emotion, gratitude can help balance the scales. 

When we are faced with a day where it feels like everything has gone wrong, taking a little time to also acknowledge what’s gone right – even if it’s the tiniest of moments – can help us feel just a tiny bit happier. 

Lynne Brown is a freelance writer, former Montessori teacher, and mom to seven amazing kids, some of whom now have kids of their own. She loves writing on parenting and early childhood education. You can learn more about her at www.lynnebrownwriting.com.

The Health Benefits of Gratitude

Happy Thanksgiving! It’s the perfect time to look at the health benefits of gratitude.  With the holidays Hearight around the corner, we look forward to celebrating with family and friends, far and near. But the holidays can often overwhelm, even as we anticipate them.

If we are already worrying about so many things in our daily lives – how well we are parenting, how well we are doing our job, whether we’ll make it to the end of the month on the money in the bank – our expectations for the holidays, and the expectations of others, can add another layer of stress. 

But Thanksgiving reminds us that a healthy dose of simple, mindful gratitude can help. November is a great time to pause and take a moment to be consciously grateful, and let that be an antidote to the stress in our lives.

Research has shown that there are health benefits of gratitude.  Over time gratitude leads to lower stress and depression and higher levels of social support.  Amy Morin, writing for Psychology Today, identifies seven scientifically-proven benefits of giving thanks.  Among them: improving physical health, sleeping better, growing social networks, and increasing mental strength.

Says another research study, “Grateful individuals are more likely to appreciate good in their lives, accept social support when needed, which boosts self-esteem, and engage in self-reassuring behaviors and less likely to be self-critical. All of these are associated with higher satisfaction with life.” (Kong, Ding, & Zhao, 2015; Petrocchi & Couyoumdjian, 2016).

Some people find that regularly using a Gratitude Journal helps them see all the things they have to be grateful for.  Others take time out of their day to be still, silent, and meditate on the good things in their life. Even a simple, conscious thought of gratefulness as we pack lunches before sending the kids off to school can contribute to stress reduction. 

The key is to be deliberate about identifying those things you are grateful for and consciously identifying them.

Says David Steindelt-Rast, in his Ted Talk on gratitude, “It is not happiness that makes us grateful, but gratefulness that makes us happy.”  He goes on to encourage listeners in a life of gratefulness by building in opportunities to notice.  He describes his own experience with noticing. After spending time in Africa, without drinkable water, he returned to his home and would stop and be consciously grateful each time he turned on the tap and fresh water poured out. A simple thing, easily overlooked.  But having done without provided the impetus toward gratitude. 

Thanksgiving reminds us to be grateful.  But gratitude, recognized throughout the regular days of our lives, offers a way to reduce our stress levels all year long. 

Next time you are feeling stressed and overwhelmed, think Gratitude.  Take some time to acknowledge the good things that crossed your path that day.  Keep a gratitude journal, send a thank you note, or share the things you are grateful for today with the ones you love. 

 

Lynne Brown is a freelance writer, former Montessori teacher, and mom to seven amazing kids, some of whom now have kids of their own.  You can learn more about her at www.lynnebrownwriting.com.