Making Music with Kids

In schools and childcare centers, teachers use music to support and engage children in the learning process. Research suggests music helps ignite cognition and memory, deepens language learning, and supports both fine and gross motor skills. 

At home, parents can also use music to support their child’s development,  help lower stress, and bring joy. Here are a few ways to incorporate a little music into your everyday routine.

Listen to Music

Add a little background music to your day by dialing into a radio station or creating a playlist and streaming it to a speaker.  Listening to classical music can lower tension and help calm anxiety.  Says Jane Collingswold at PsychCentral, “Listening to music can have a tremendously relaxing effect on our minds and bodies, especially slow, quiet classical music. 

This type of music can have a beneficial effect on our physiological functions, slowing the pulse and heart rate, lowering blood pressure, and decreasing the levels of stress hormones.”

For children who need help settling into rest time, a quiet, gentle series of lullabies can set the mood and encourage sleep.  My all-time favorite rest time CD is the Bejing Angelic Choir’s Chinese Lullabies.

Sing Songs

Take a break from the normal routine and enjoy a sing-along. Toddlers delight in circle time, which can include silly songs with lots of body movement.  Some of my favorites are “If You’re Happy and You Know It”, “The Itsy Bitsy Spider”, and “The Bear Went Over the Mountain”.  You can also incorporate singing into other family activities.  Riding in the car? Start a sing-along, complete with hand motions and silly faces

Make Instruments

Take it a step further and add instruments to your family sing-a-long. Create your own family band with instruments made from found objects. From simple storage container shakers to pan flutes and cereal box guitars,  Red Tricycle has put together a collection of 21 instruments you can make from things you have at home.

Have a Dance Party

Once the music is flowing, combine gross motor activity and music through dance. Turn up some rhythmic dance music and get moving. Or enjoy an acapella version of the Hokie Pokie for family fun that will have you all smiling.

Take a Deeper Dive

Have older kids? Help them explore the life and discography of a favorite composer or band. Check out your local library for materials, or search for information on the internet.  Add the composer’s music to a playlist and incorporate it into your family music listening (and dancing!).  You can also choose a period in history and see what you can find out about music and musical instruments of that time period.  Or explore the music of a particular region or country.  Invite your kids to compare the music you find in your explorations to the music your family typically listens to.  How are they different?  What is similar about them? 

Learn to Play an Instrument

For the truly adventurous and dedicated, learning to play an instrument can provide a lifetime of musical enjoyment. It also builds confidence and improves patience.  Says classicfm.com, “Learning to play an instrument stimulates the brain, improving functions like memory and abstract reasoning skills, which are essential for maths and science.”  Learning a musical instrument takes time and commitment, but can bring joy that lasts a lifetime.

 

Lynne Brown is a freelance writer, former Montessori teacher, and mom to seven amazing kids, some of whom now have kids of their own. She loves writing on parenting and early childhood education. You can learn more about her at www.lynnebrownwriting.com.