The Health Benefits of Gratitude

Happy Thanksgiving! It’s the perfect time to look at the health benefits of gratitude.  With the holidays Hearight around the corner, we look forward to celebrating with family and friends, far and near. But the holidays can often overwhelm, even as we anticipate them.

If we are already worrying about so many things in our daily lives – how well we are parenting, how well we are doing our job, whether we’ll make it to the end of the month on the money in the bank – our expectations for the holidays, and the expectations of others, can add another layer of stress. 

But Thanksgiving reminds us that a healthy dose of simple, mindful gratitude can help. November is a great time to pause and take a moment to be consciously grateful, and let that be an antidote to the stress in our lives.

Research has shown that there are health benefits of gratitude.  Over time gratitude leads to lower stress and depression and higher levels of social support.  Amy Morin, writing for Psychology Today, identifies seven scientifically-proven benefits of giving thanks.  Among them: improving physical health, sleeping better, growing social networks, and increasing mental strength.

Says another research study, “Grateful individuals are more likely to appreciate good in their lives, accept social support when needed, which boosts self-esteem, and engage in self-reassuring behaviors and less likely to be self-critical. All of these are associated with higher satisfaction with life.” (Kong, Ding, & Zhao, 2015; Petrocchi & Couyoumdjian, 2016).

Some people find that regularly using a Gratitude Journal helps them see all the things they have to be grateful for.  Others take time out of their day to be still, silent, and meditate on the good things in their life. Even a simple, conscious thought of gratefulness as we pack lunches before sending the kids off to school can contribute to stress reduction. 

The key is to be deliberate about identifying those things you are grateful for and consciously identifying them.

Says David Steindelt-Rast, in his Ted Talk on gratitude, “It is not happiness that makes us grateful, but gratefulness that makes us happy.”  He goes on to encourage listeners in a life of gratefulness by building in opportunities to notice.  He describes his own experience with noticing. After spending time in Africa, without drinkable water, he returned to his home and would stop and be consciously grateful each time he turned on the tap and fresh water poured out. A simple thing, easily overlooked.  But having done without provided the impetus toward gratitude. 

Thanksgiving reminds us to be grateful.  But gratitude, recognized throughout the regular days of our lives, offers a way to reduce our stress levels all year long. 

Next time you are feeling stressed and overwhelmed, think Gratitude.  Take some time to acknowledge the good things that crossed your path that day.  Keep a gratitude journal, send a thank you note, or share the things you are grateful for today with the ones you love.